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Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)
sending in peacekeepers, which france says it would back. eu foreign ministers have been talking about the conflict, agreeing that african troops should take over from the french asap. >> here's more on the story beginning with germany's involvement. >> german aircraft could soon be used to support french intervention in mali, providing mid-air refueling to french planes as they go to combat zones. the proposed increase in german military involvement has been welcomed by lawmakers from the governing coalition. >> it is about making more support available to our french partners. to help make sure that mali does not turn into a breeding ground for international terrorists. >> germany has already provided two military transport planes to help transport african union troops with a third ready if needed, but further help will require approval from parliament. the green party do not see it as a simple yes vote. >> the crucial thing about this military involvement is that it must lead to a political process because the military cannot solve the problem. >> parliament must also approve a plann
a poll in frons show those in the uk would prefer to leave the eu. we are waiting on the results from italy's latest debt auction. it will be two years of a zero coupon and five years of an italian linked paper. we'll get the results coming up in just a moment. here is a check of the european markets. we have seen them particular to the upside. now with the exception of spain trying to fight back into the green this morning, bolstered basically by the general risk on attitude. perhaps some of the credit flows, some of the equity fund flows boosting stock markets around the world. here is a look at who is leading the index this morning. onte paschi is on the top of the board, up 6.35%. today it's continued to snap back on hopes of.continued investor returnings. asml, elements which help make computer chips is up about 4%. it has been upgraded. it's viewed as a winner here in the mobile phone wars as more continue to shift to that market. sbm offshore, peugeot, tnt express towards top of the pack. at the bottom, it's a different story. down 3.5% o a downgrade, some other companies there
. some 200,000 have moved to other parts of the country. the eu says aid agencies are facing major problems in trying to help the people affected in the north. >> i appeal to all those involved in the conflict to do all they can to insure that organizations provide the humanitarian assistance to people on the ground -- so people on the ground faces few obstacles as possible and that permissions are given as quickly as possible. >> and land that has been devastated by drought is now faced with a humanitarian crisis. >> food insecurity is a very major concern. in mali, despite a good harvest, we worry that some 4 million or 5 million people may be in need of food assistance. >> the commissioner says the eu is ready to add to the 93 million euros of aid it has already sent, both to help mali and neighboring countries like niger where tens of thousands of people have already taken refuge. >> moving to the czech republic and our voting has begun to let the country's new president. around 8 million voters are choosing between two candidates. the foreign minister, the heir to one of centr
risen to 26%. half of young people are out of work. but the eu has signaled it is willing to relax rules on spain, which could help soften the austerity measures apparently crippling the country. >> germany may be about to drop its objections to bailing out cyprus. despite misgivings about reports of money laundering by the island's thanks. >> a number of politicians in germany have accused separate banks of holding significant illegal deposits with russian money, something they deny. they had threatened to refuse to finalize a bailout unless the country clean up -- clint of its act, but berlin is reported to have relented after pressure from other eurozone countries. cyprus needs about 17.5 billion euros to keep afloat. >> onto wednesday's market action now, and european shares dropped later in the session, reaction to weak economic data out of the united states. our correspondents and as the summary from the frankfurt stock exchange. -- our correspondent sent us this summary from the frankfurt stock exchange. >> the people here are convinced that the euro sovereign debt crisis is slowl
african forces. >> germany has also offered transport aircraft. the eu is sending military trainers, but time is of the essence if the west is to prevent it from falling into the hands of the radical jihad is. >> on to business news now, the german economy contracted in the final quarter of last year as the eurozone crisis took its toll, but europe's biggest economy still managed to post modest growth of 0.7%. >> that may not sound like much, but it is more than you expect from most eurozone economies. >> the eurozone crisis has not been able to dampen the mood among eurozone consumers. they are still hitting shops and helping the economy grow modestly. >> despite big increases in the cost of energy, raw materials, and oil, private consumption is up. that is the first reason. the second is that the german economy remained competitive last year despite a weaker environment, and that has given exports a boost. >> exports are the backbone of the german economy. they continued to grow last year, albeit at a slower rate. companies are proceeding with caution. they are cutting investment
, but the eu says the onus is of the industry to work on a solution. >> they need to address the accusations made by agricultural scientists. there will be another round table on thursday, and we will consider what measure we need to take. >> the european consumer affairs commissioner is opposed to a band. in spite of the dangers presented. to help new methods can be developed that do not rely on pesticides. they may be more expensive, but without bees, farmers will not be able to pollinate their crops. >> well, that's it from us. we'll be back on the hour in an hour. >> thanks for staying with us. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org--
for military operations against the militants. the imf and the eu already pledged money to support the beleaguered economy. i jubilation and towns across northern mali. people here know how fragile of their security is. the militants may have vanished for now and the desert, but any sign of weakness and they could return. few relished the prospect of a long guerrilla war. >> let's get the latest live from timbuktu. tom went into timbuktu with the troops and he joins us live. the islamist rebels out of sight but not out of mind? >> exactly. they are believed to be hiding in surrounding desert. but i can tell you the tension is rising here in timbuktu. there are scenes of looting downtown, with dozens of people out in the streets going one shop after the other, targeting shops that were held by ethnic touraregs. accusing them of collaborating with ms -- islamists and they say they are hiding arms, cash, and weapons. the malian army deployed in town, and is trying to contain the crowd, although it is not clear because there also kind of smiling and waving at the crowd. they have pulle
or not to stay in the european union, britain one of the e.u.'s largest economy, the most important financial center, and, oh, yes, the pound sterling at odds with the euro. markets up more than 4% year to date. my next guest says while some investors are still on the sidelines, we're beginning to see a little bit more interest. joining us now with his outlook for the markets and the economy, of course, chief investment strategist for ubs wealth management, mike ryan. mike, good to have you here. >> good to be here. lou: a lot of fun in the european union. start there. we're not hearing so much about the collapse of the e.u., david cameron has other ideas, but the reality seems to be that things are quieting down a bit over there and not influencing our markets nearly so much. >> i think that's fair. i think what we're seeing, really, in the eurozone is an absence of mall las. the last couple years, an existential crisis, would the euro and player survive? a lot has been taken off the table by the posture of the european central bank saying we're standing behind the sovereigns. where does the
to respond. they have not taken any decisions beyond that. it is now for a eu states coming up at the 12th of march deadline whether or not they want to amend that in any way. it could be an unmanned -- amended so it would apply to the regime and not to opposition forces. it could be amended in many other ways. it would require the agreement of all member states. >> i understand we are already supplying equipment to elements within the surreal -- syria opposition. i am interested to know, that could be military. how strict is this embargo? is it possible if we are giving communications equipment that could be used a in conjunction with weaponry supplied by turkey? or some other countries to elements within the opposition? >> it is not military. it is certainly not lethal. the assistance includes things like the deployment of our response team to work with their opposition on their future plans. how they are getting help to people with basic needs. we are training through citizen journalist. we are providing water purification hits and generators to help civilians. -- water purification kit
the e.u. to impose sanctions on hezbollah, and you have been a believer that we should not do it alone, we should do with unilateral. what we do take the chance and urged the european union to sanction has a lot? is we shouldn insurer swer not be writing lesser proof, i think the president is the appropriate official. >> and congress has no interest in whether the e.u. would be sanctioned as a terrorist or a station? >> the congress has a responsibility in a lot of things. >> that me ask you this about the iranian revolutionary guard. he said a minute ago you think they are a terrorist recession. do you agree? bailout yes. >> and you voted against the amendment designating them as a terrorist organization because they are recognized as a state? iran, you would not want to designate the army of a recognized as a terrorist? >> i just clarify a statement on iran being a recognized nation by the nine nations, by most world bodies. the reason why i did not vote as 22 other members that because i think jim webb's argument was a strong argument, and that is we have -- and this is what he said
and then the eu, arms embargo in 2004, a flood of weaponry came into libya. most of it was over a billion dollars, which in absolute terms may not be that great but relative to what was there before and what the purpose is, what it was used for, created, i was an unfair playing field. you couldn't say that we were, your, this was not a usual issue a source we were concerned. that process, and i argue, as i argue in the book, was very much tied to the whole issue of ask not, putting accountability in place for, you know, what we would get, what gadhafi would not do as a result of the agreements that were signed with him. a lot of people, i think that weaponry, again, small arms, surveillance equipment, all of the sort of things you'd need to put down a popular revolt was put in the hands of the regime, essentially due to complicity and lack of attention by parties in the west. so that's one, one thing. as far as what president, civil war, you know, civil wars are, you know, that's a key question, and i don't -- the preponderance come in, the rebels themselves managed to present a case that ask for
the sum total of all of your votes, refusing to sign a letter to the e.u. asking hezbollah to be designated a terrorist organization, being one of 22 to vote to guard terrorist terrorist organization, one of two to vote on sanction this body tried to make on iran and the statements you made after palestinians and about the jewish lobby, all of that together, that the image you created is one of sending the worst possible signal to enemies and friends at one of the most critical times in world history? >> i would not agree with that. if you had a chance tomorrow, today, after lunch, vote to say the iranian revolutionary guard was terrorist organization would you vote no? >> times change. it recognize that. yes, i would reconsider. >> thank you. that encouraging. >> bret: interesting exchange with lindsey graham. back with the panel. you talk about senator graham's exchange with chuck hagel. >> now that we have shown everyone how spontaneous and non-rehearsed we, are i was thinking of the tape where he quotes hagel saying the jewish lobby has intimidated senators in to voting
. that says something about academia and the world. did you see the poster the e.u.? showing all the symbols of europe? it showed a cross, star of david, crescent and so on, and a hammer and cycle. there was a bit -- there's an outcry from the lit wanians, and why aren't we in the west sympathetic enough to the sufferers, the persecutors under communism to subject ourselves? why leave it to these? but there it was. i'm fairly relaxed about the communism symbols. you see a guy with a cccp sweatshirt and his trinkets. i did a study of this, a simple magazine piece, and, you know, they are not the worst. people say it's proof we won and can mock it. it's just kind of funny. you don't see swastikas and people saying, oh, relax, it's just a t-shirt. as was pointed out, there was just one good picture taken in his life, looks like a movie star in the picture, the cheekbones just right, but other pictures, not all that much, really, honestly. let me -- this is all regarding chambers, really, but he was a witness and a truth teller e and it was really, really hard for him to fore sake, not pop pew l
the world. did you see this poster from the e.u.? showing all the symbols of europe? it showed a cross, the star of david and the muslim crescent and so on and the hammer and sickle. there is an outcry from the lithuanians and i asked why does it take the lithuanians ,-com,-com ma why aren't we in the west sympathetic enough to sufferers persecuted under communism to object ourselves? why leave it to these folks but there it was. i am fairly relaxed about these common symbols. if you see a guy with the ccc piece white shirt and you see these trinkets and hammers and sickles and so on. i once did a study of this, simple magazine piece, and some people say it's proof that we weren't that we can mock that. is just kind of funny. you don't see swastikas and he don't see pictures of goering on t-shirts and you don't have people say it's just a t-shirt. daniels points out che guevara only took one good picture in his life. he looks like a movie star in the picture. he got his cheekbones just right but other pictures he wasn't that much really, honestly. this is all regarded in chambers reall
of your votes, refusing to sign a letter to the e.u. asking hezbollah to be designated a terrorist organization, being one of 22 to vote to designate the iranian revolutionary guard a terrorist organization, being one of two on two occasions to vote against sanctions that this body was trying to impose on iran, the statements you made about palestinians and about the jewish lobby, all that together. that the image you created is one of sending the worst possible signal to our enemies and friends at one of the most critical times in world history? >> no, i would not agree with that. because i have taken actions and made statements very clear as to what i believe hezbollah and hamas are as a terrorist organizations. >> if you had a chance tomorrow, today, after lunch, to vote to say that the iranian revolutionary guard was a terrorist organization. would you still vote no? >> the reason i voted no to start with... >> well i know why, you told me that. my question is would you reconsider and would you vote yes this time? or would you still vote no? >> times change. i recognize that an
to the e.u. asking hezbollah to be designated a terrorist organization, being one of 22 to vote to designate the iranian revolutionary guard a terrorist organization, being one of two on two occasions to vote against sanctions that this body was trying to impose on iran, the statements you made about palestinians and about the jewish lobby, all that together. that the image you created is one of sending the worst possible signal to our enemies and friends at one of the most critical times in world history? >> no, i would not agree with that. because i have taken actions and made statements very clear as to what i believe hezbollah and hamas are as a terrorist organizations. >> if you had a chance tomorrow, today, after lunch, to vote to say that the iranian revolutionary guard was a terrorist organization. would you still vote no? >> the reason i voted no to start with... >> well i know why, you told me that. my question is would you reconsider and would you vote yes this time? or would you still vote no? >> times change. i recognize that and, yes, i would reconsider. >> well, t
eu9 days. i -- every 90 days. i think the appropriators of the house and senate would come together. but every 90 days there would be an additional 1% until the appropriations bills or the year-long resolution has been enacted. these are designinged to keep both sides at the bargaining table. they aren't so small as to be irrelevant, but they're not so large as to cut 234eu programs. priorities of both republicans and democrats would be subject to the same across-the-board cuts. and both parties therefore would have an incentive to come to an agreement that fully funds priority programs and reduces funding for lower priorities. this bipartisan amendment may not be each lawmaker's idea of perfect. it is not mine smed i would rather get all the appropriations bills done. but that's not what's happening. but we should all agree that it improves upon the current situation where we bounce from crisis to crisis, worried about government shutdowns as well as to rush bills to avoid shutdowns much the american people want us to complete our work in a logical way. and this amendment helps us
trying to convince the e.u. to designate hezbollah as a global terrorist organization. this will be some interesting hearings and i think the senate will ask some pretty tough questions. jenna: to generalize that that that is interesting because it is about being able to name who our enmy -- enemies are in a broad context. general scales, senator kerry and senator hagel, both vets and supporters of the military and critics of the military as well. how do you have the two vets in high positions potentially? what would that mean? >> that's a great question. first of all i tend to support the person over the policy. i testified before senator hagel's committee in 2007 over the surge and i talked with him at length after my testimony. i will tell you this. one thing that struck me about him is enormous empathy for the american soldier. and as the military draws down he is going to be a person i think who maintains the trust and the compact that the government has with our returning veterans from iraq and afghanistan. so here's a buy who has seen war, who understands the nature and character
barack obama and the eu, i think even hillary clinton would agree at this point, what difference does it make? which, by the way is going to be her campaign slogan in 2016. the nobel peace prize should go to people who risk their lives and doing heroic work and whose efforts will be magna advertised by recognition from this award. hillary clinton does not risk her life. she does not do heroic work. i have been waiting all day to hear from mr. garland nixon about what she has done for any tangible effort at peace whatsoever. >> garland, let us know? what do you think? >> a couple of things. first of all with former president clinton, if you look at the clinton foundation, they have donated upwards of $30 million to haiti since the earthquake. they have been responsible for literally millions of people getting -- in africa getting medication for h.i.v. and aids. it's hard to question the clinton foundation and what they have done. >> what about hillary? secretary clinton i should say. >> one of the important things she has done is taken the state department in a fundamentally different
british voters to decide whether or not they should exit the eu by 2017. cameron argued for continued membership but in a more streamlined european union with fewer restrictive regulations. >> from our parade of papers, "the omaha world herald," the governor of nebraska has given the okay for the keystone pipeline to run through his state effectively leaving the decision now of whether or not to green-light the 1700-mile project to the obama administration. the president has pushed back a decision on the project until after march, but the pipeline's future remains in doubt as president obama rejected a plan a year ago, you'll recall, saying the legislation didn't give enough time for the government to give it a thorough review. >> and you know, michael steele, we were talking this morning about how the republicans move forward in a more thoughtful, strategic way. still being tough. >> yeah. >> you can be tough. you can be conservative. you can still be smart. >> be smart. that's right. >> we haven't been smart. a guy who has been smart, chris christie. new quinnipiac poll numbers out
to -- ountries that aspire to ascendancy in the eu. progress there will continue american leadership. i hope we will continue to work again to the region to ensure -- in the region to ensure that they continue to make progress. >> we will, senator. thank you for your leadership of the european foreign subcommittee. i look forward to working with a. -- you. >> senator kerry, i appreciate your thoughtful opening statement in response to these questions. i have a great deal of respect for your level of experience. i would've enjoyed working with you as a member of the committee. i will enjoy working with you as secretary of state. these are complex issues, these are dangerous times. i grew up helping politics at the water's edge and was true. -- hoping that that maxim that politics ends at the water's edge was true. i believe we share the same goals. we want a secure, prosperous america. i think that starts being open and honest with each other. i hate to go back to yesterday's news and by yesterday when i was asking a relatively simple question, secretary clinton's reaction was "what difference a
that aspire to ascendancy in the eu. progress there will continue american leadership. i hope we will continue to work again to the region to ensure they continue to make progress. >> we will, senator. thank you for your leadership of the european foreign subcommittee. i look forward to working with a. >> senator kerry, i appreciate your thoughtful opening statement in response to these questions. i have a great deal of respect for your level of experience. i would've enjoyed working with you as a member of the committee. i will enjoy working with you as secretary of state. these are complex issues, these are dangerous times. i grew up helping politics at the water's edge and was true. i believe we share the same goals. we want a secure, prosperous america. i think that starts being open and honest with each other. i hate to go back to yesterday's news and by yesterday when i was asking a relatively simple question, secretary clinton's reaction was i think it makes a big difference. i think it matters a great deal at the american people get the truth. i think they have the right to be told the
pleated, we still have those countries that aspear to ascend ancy into the e.u. i would just urge you that further progress in that area is going to continue to require american leadership. i hope that we will continue to work in the region to ensure that they continue to make progress. >> we will, senator. i just want to thank you for your leadership of the european affairs subcommittee you've done a tremendous job working on it and i look forward to working with you. >> senator kerry, i appreciate your thoughtful opening statement and your thoughtful response to these questions. i have a great deal of respect for your global experience, your depth of knowledge in these areas. i would have enjoyed working with you as a member of the committee and i'm going to enjoy working with you as secretary of state. as you said, these are complex issues and these are dangerous times. i certainly grew up hoping that that maxim of politics ends at the water's edge was actually true. i'm not sure it ever was but it's something to aspear to. we have the same goals, we want a prosperous and secure am
leverage the market. there has been some talks about a u.s.-eu partnership. i do not know if that can become reality. we need to think about not creating a threat where there is not one. understand carefully where we can find the basis of better cooperation. i want someone saying, kerry has a mistaken notion of what china is doing. i am not saying you do not have to be careful and understand where it is going. i am not talking about retreating from our current levels. i am trying to think about how we do this in a way that does not create the reaction you do not want to create. >> senator mccain. >> your 29 years of service is a great example for those of us newcomers. i thank you for that. in the opening round of russian --assurance, we raised issues about the western hemisphere. i worry that our firm -- our foreign policy has been very oriented east-west. the north-south access is important. i worry about the chinese being all over the americas. in a time -- we could see our influenzae road. i hope that the state department has that north-south access as they keep focus. your openin
and to the e.u., and i would just urge you that further progress in that area is going to continue to require american leadership, and i hope that we will continue to work in the region to ensure that they continue to make progress. >> we will, senator. and i just want to thank you for your leadership of the subcommittee. you've been absolutely terrific and i look forward to working with you. thanks. >> senator johnson. >> thank you, mr. chairman. senator, i appreciate your thoughtful opening statement and your thoughtful response to these questions. i have a great deal of respect for your level of experience, your knowledge in these areas and i would have enjoyed working with you as a member of the committee. i'm going to enjoy working with you as the secretary of state and i mean that in all sincerity. i want to have a close working relationship. as used in your opening statement, these are complex times. you know, i sort of grew up hoping that that maximum of politics at the water's edge was actually true. i'm not sure it ever was, but i think it's something we can aspire to. i truly think
ol skr*eus tha anesthesiologist that puts people to sleep and wakes them up for a living. they say consolidation is very important and it happens while we are sleeping. what is it? >> husbands can now use this as an excuse as to why they forgot to take the trash out because they didn't get a good night sleep. whaoeufpl we are sleeping the brain is working and it's working on over time to consolidate memories. what this means is that things that we encounter during the day, conscious or subconscious they get processed in networks or frame works within the brain. they get sorted based upon some common patterns and they also get stored and downloaded, similar to when you back up your computers. it's a process that will store all the memory that you need to have. jaime: let's say you're not a good sleeper. >> absolutely. jaime: how bad a shape are you in, then? jaime: what they've been showing is that the brain basically functions on delta waives during deep sleep and normally right now when we're talking we are having alpha and beta waves which are fast low voltage waves. when you get
refused to position the e.u. to identify hezbollah as a terrorist group. third, in november of twee, you failed to -- 2003, you failed to vote on a syrian accountability act with sanctions -- occupation of lebanon. four, in 2001, you were one of only two senators that year to vote against renewal of the iran-libya sanctions act. and lastly, in 2001, you were one of four senators who refused to sign the letter supporting israel. are those accurate? >> well, let's start with the -- >> no. i just want to know if the statement -- these are votes that took place. do you agree those votes took place? >> i want to ask the letter that you just noted in your fifth point, what was the date in the letter? >> the date. >> you said i refused to sign letter. >> october of 2001. >> a letter to -- >> ok. skip that one. is the other ones true? >> well, it was fairly important -- >> it's very important. i was holding the letter at the time that we were gathering signatures. >> i see. on the 2008 question regarding designating the revolutionary guard as a terrorist organization, i did vote against it. >> i
total of all of your votes refusing to sign a letter to the eu, asking has a lot to be designated as a terrorist organization, being one of 22 to vote to designate the iranian revolutionary guard as a terrorist organization, being one of two to vote against sanctions this body was trying to impose on iran, the statements you have made about palestinians and the jewish lobby -- all of that together, that the image you have created is one of sending the worst possible signal to our enemies and friends at one of the most critical times in world history? >> no, i would not agree with that because i have taken actions and made statements very clear as to what i believe hezbollah and hamas are as terrorist organizations. >> if there was a vote on the floor of the senate this afternoon to label the iranian national -- revolutionary guard, the people that killed soldiers in iraq, some of the most vicious people to the people of iran themselves, if there was a vote would you still vote no? >> i would want to know from the president what they were doing. ask i mean you read the paper, you w
at the e.u. level. we have been for investigation for it almost two years by the commissioner there and his staff. during this period, they comment from everybody and we give them literally millions of documents. we are busy negotiating with them. we don't think we violated any european laws, but we're happy to have the conversation and 're sort of now waiting on with a they decide to do. we have been negotiating back and forth and they have announced that publicly. in the united states, the law is similar but different if the way it's applied. in our indication, the government to have the federal trade commission look at this and a similar investigation is underway. there were a sers of hearings. i testified at the hearings and, again, i don't see the consumer arm under section 2 and we have asked the government to come back and give us the examples of things which are violations of law. we haven't seen that yet we are also in negotiations with them. that's probably all i should y. what i would say is we talk to these people a lot. we're waiting on them at some level. the ideal scenarioou
sessions already with our eu partners on doing exactly that. one interesting aspect you raised is those have not necessarily included the private sector or the critical infrastructure sectors. expanding the aperture to do that would make sense. >> in our last few minutes, thank you offer very important questions. secretary naplitano, as the content your future -- as you think about your future and some of the unfinished business, what is your highest priority? >> i think when i look at where i will be spending my time, aside from the management integration type issues, i think the coming immigration debate is something that we will be deeply involved in. we have deep and wide experience in those issues. cyber, we have already mentioned. then the constantly evolving types of terrorists threats and hamdi can better educate ourselves -- and how we can better educate ourselves, trained law enforcement, ascertain from history and otherwise what are better ways to identify behavior's indicate -- in take up potential violence, those are the things that concern me -- ways to identify and behavi
enlarging the stability in europe itself by enlarging our institution, the eu or nato. what's happened to that agenda? is a no longer a part of the democratic countries? and if the answer is was so care about -- are whether georgia can become more stable, how do we get smarter about it? it isn't obvious our institutions hold the same if you used to hold five or six years ago. it isn't obvious that comes like ukraine had to stay democratizing instinct, the country of central europe had 10 years ago. so what, if anything, would you do different to make sure part of your democratic in state? >> i'd like to say quickly, i think some countries have taken a bit of an appetite suppressant when he came to their ambitions of being part of the european union, for example. >> but they are democratic. >> but they are democratic. but there also has to be benefit that flows. i think that is very much a part of the typos as to whether people are going to pursue being part of a larger union, being part of an obsession like nato. there has to be some apparent benefit in so doing. you know, the ability
. -- that our current immigration system is not working effectively, indeed is 235eu8ing 0en 00 -- indeed is failing ton a daily basis cannot be denied. it needs to be fixed. it is a challenge for us to do so and will not be easy. i would, however, warn my colleagues that a framework is not a bill. and in 2006 and 2007 with the full support of the republican president of the united states, a bipartisan committee announced with great confidence that they had a plan that was going to fix our immigration system and we were all just going to line upped and vote for it much the masters of the universe had decided -- they'd meat in secret, they had all the special interest groups gather and they had worked out a plan that was going to change our immigration system for the better and we should all be most grateful. it came up with 2006, it did not pass. it came back again in 2007 with even more emphasis, and it failed coul loss -- and it failed colossally. it did not do it what they said it would do. it did not end the illegality. it did not set forth a proper principle of immigration for amer
Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)